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Last Chance for Louboutin

Christian Louboutin python pumpsChristian Louboutin was in court yesterday to witness lawyers make a final plea to defend his red-sole trademark.

 

“For YSL and PPR Group, this might just be a legal matter, but that’s not the case for me,” Louboutin said. “On the contrary, to me it is very personal; after all, this is an intrinsic part of my life and my company, which bears my name – and which I have built over the past 20 years and still independently own. This is why I had to be there in person.”

 

Last April Christian Louboutin sued Yves Saint Laurent for putting red soles on its shoes during their pre spring/summer 2011/12 collection.

 

Louboutin continued to file a trademark infringement lawsuit, alleging that YSL has breached its copyright by using the red sole.

 

Christian Louboutin python sandalsThe designer, who in turn celebrates twenty years of his unmistakable heels, said he needed to protect his recognisable style to keep YSL and “other copyists” from stealing his business.

 

But last August federal Judge Victor Marrero dismissed Louboutin’s needs, ruling that the shoe designer was not allowed to trademark a colour.
The panel of three appeals court judges hearing the case are currently deciding whether the original judgment – allowing YSL to continue selling its red, monochromatic pump from the 2011 resort collection. If the judgment is reversed, YSL and Louboutin will undergo another trial to attempt to resolve the lawsuit.

 

Louboutin told WWD: “I was impressed by the way the judges ran the hearing. The company remains confident that the appeals court will adhere to its conviction that the red sole, this integral and long-held part of the brand’s identity and recognised by consumers worldwide, will continue to be recognised as the Christian Louboutin trademark.”

 

Yesterday dozens of spectators came out in support of the trial, many of whom were spotted wearing the distinctive shoes.

 

The case continues.

 

Images courtesy of net-a-porter.com


1 Comment

  1. I hope they let him trademark the red soles. That is what they are, you know instantly when you see a red sole that it’s a Christian Louboutin. It would be a very sad day if other brands were allowed to do the same. Either way CL are known for the red soled shoes and YSL are not, surely the courts will see sense? Fingers crossed anyway! Great Article :)

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